1. thetenssf:

    At the DMV

  2. Local artist Eugene White’s storefront studio window on Hayes St. offers an unexpected treat.
onelensonefilm:

Combos 62 and 63. Art by Eugene White. Art in his storefront studio window, 2080 Hayes St., San Francisco, CA.
Yoona lens, AO DLX film (#62); Yonna lens, AO BW film (#63).
Local artist Eugene White’s storefront studio window on Hayes St. offers an unexpected treat.
onelensonefilm:

Combos 62 and 63. Art by Eugene White. Art in his storefront studio window, 2080 Hayes St., San Francisco, CA.
Yoona lens, AO DLX film (#62); Yonna lens, AO BW film (#63).
    Local artist Eugene White’s storefront studio window on Hayes St. offers an unexpected treat.
onelensonefilm:

Combos 62 and 63. Art by Eugene White. Art in his storefront studio window, 2080 Hayes St., San Francisco, CA.
Yoona lens, AO DLX film (#62); Yonna lens, AO BW film (#63).
Local artist Eugene White’s storefront studio window on Hayes St. offers an unexpected treat.
onelensonefilm:

Combos 62 and 63. Art by Eugene White. Art in his storefront studio window, 2080 Hayes St., San Francisco, CA.
Yoona lens, AO DLX film (#62); Yonna lens, AO BW film (#63).

    Local artist Eugene White’s storefront studio window on Hayes St. offers an unexpected treat.

    onelensonefilm:

    Combos 62 and 63. Art by Eugene White. Art in his storefront studio window, 2080 Hayes St., San Francisco, CA.

    Yoona lens, AO DLX film (#62); Yonna lens, AO BW film (#63).

  3. onelensonefilm:

    Combo 60. An Opel makes a Pit Stop. San Francisco, CA.

    Yoona lens, Blanko Freedom 13 film.

  4. onelensonefilm:

    Combo 56. No trespassing, with aluminum duct tape. San Francisco, CA.

    Yoona lens, Rock BW-11 film.

  5. onelensonefilm:

Combos 54 and 55. Wheatpaste by Calen Blake. San Francisco, CA.
Yoona lens, OG film (#54); Yoona lens, RTV film (#55)
onelensonefilm:

Combos 54 and 55. Wheatpaste by Calen Blake. San Francisco, CA.
Yoona lens, OG film (#54); Yoona lens, RTV film (#55)
    onelensonefilm:

Combos 54 and 55. Wheatpaste by Calen Blake. San Francisco, CA.
Yoona lens, OG film (#54); Yoona lens, RTV film (#55)
onelensonefilm:

Combos 54 and 55. Wheatpaste by Calen Blake. San Francisco, CA.
Yoona lens, OG film (#54); Yoona lens, RTV film (#55)

    onelensonefilm:

    Combos 54 and 55. Wheatpaste by Calen Blake. San Francisco, CA.

    Yoona lens, OG film (#54); Yoona lens, RTV film (#55)

  6. onelensonefilm:

    Combo 53. Barista dude. Mojo Bicycle Cafe. San Francisco, CA.

    Yoona lens, DC film.

  7. Have a heart. “Repurposed” fire alarm. Corner of Broderick and Hayes.

    Photo by KT Drasky.

  8. “I feel like living in San Francisco sometimes feels like a giant bubble, but this neighborhood felt like it was living the truth.”

    - Rumors of Popeyes potentially leaving the Corridor results in some serious self-examination for neighborhood residents, as reported by Sara Deseran in San Francisco Magazine.

    Read more about San Francisco’s favorite chain, located at 599 Divis, here.

  9. Another new mural on the garage door at Oak near Divis (aka around the corner from Vinyl). And this one is signed by artist Jonny Alexander.

    Hoodline’s got more deets than you can shake a can of spray paint at on this continuing neighborhood phenomenon. But a couple of quick facts: The Vinyl folks helped Johnny get permission to paint his mural, which is called “A Cross Section of Land and Sky”. It took 11 hours. And, you can follow this dude on Instagram, which you should probably do: @jonnyalexander.

    See previous murals here and here.

    Photo by KT Drasky.

  10. That’s not just any mural going up on the side of Laundry Daze at 1233 Divisadero, right next to the parking lot for the Little Zion Church. That’s a Mel Waters mural.
That’s Mel taking a quick break here in the bottom shot. Mel’s finishing up “Harlem of the West” today. Check it out when you’re walking by.
You can follow Mel on Instagram at melwaters. If you like the ink on his arms, it looks like he can do some nice body art for you, too. When he’s not painting murals, he does high class tattoos.
The Divisadero Corridor has periodically tried to recapture the spirit of the days when the Western Addition, particularly Fillmore and Divisadero streets were known as “The Harlem of the West.” A short-lived campaign a few years ago almost resulted in a billboard at Divisadero and Hayes reclaiming this title and featuring jazz musician and KPOO.FM deejay Bobbie “Spider” Webb.  Sadly, the project was stopped at the 11th hour by the owners of the long vacant Harding Theater. (Read more about that unfortunate episode here.)
Mel has permission from the owner of Laundry Daze to paint his mural on the side of their building. Let’s hope it stands the test of our current times and brings about more creative projects celebrating Divisadero’s place in San Francisco (and jazz) history.
Photos by KT Drasky. That’s not just any mural going up on the side of Laundry Daze at 1233 Divisadero, right next to the parking lot for the Little Zion Church. That’s a Mel Waters mural.
That’s Mel taking a quick break here in the bottom shot. Mel’s finishing up “Harlem of the West” today. Check it out when you’re walking by.
You can follow Mel on Instagram at melwaters. If you like the ink on his arms, it looks like he can do some nice body art for you, too. When he’s not painting murals, he does high class tattoos.
The Divisadero Corridor has periodically tried to recapture the spirit of the days when the Western Addition, particularly Fillmore and Divisadero streets were known as “The Harlem of the West.” A short-lived campaign a few years ago almost resulted in a billboard at Divisadero and Hayes reclaiming this title and featuring jazz musician and KPOO.FM deejay Bobbie “Spider” Webb.  Sadly, the project was stopped at the 11th hour by the owners of the long vacant Harding Theater. (Read more about that unfortunate episode here.)
Mel has permission from the owner of Laundry Daze to paint his mural on the side of their building. Let’s hope it stands the test of our current times and brings about more creative projects celebrating Divisadero’s place in San Francisco (and jazz) history.
Photos by KT Drasky.
    That’s not just any mural going up on the side of Laundry Daze at 1233 Divisadero, right next to the parking lot for the Little Zion Church. That’s a Mel Waters mural.
That’s Mel taking a quick break here in the bottom shot. Mel’s finishing up “Harlem of the West” today. Check it out when you’re walking by.
You can follow Mel on Instagram at melwaters. If you like the ink on his arms, it looks like he can do some nice body art for you, too. When he’s not painting murals, he does high class tattoos.
The Divisadero Corridor has periodically tried to recapture the spirit of the days when the Western Addition, particularly Fillmore and Divisadero streets were known as “The Harlem of the West.” A short-lived campaign a few years ago almost resulted in a billboard at Divisadero and Hayes reclaiming this title and featuring jazz musician and KPOO.FM deejay Bobbie “Spider” Webb.  Sadly, the project was stopped at the 11th hour by the owners of the long vacant Harding Theater. (Read more about that unfortunate episode here.)
Mel has permission from the owner of Laundry Daze to paint his mural on the side of their building. Let’s hope it stands the test of our current times and brings about more creative projects celebrating Divisadero’s place in San Francisco (and jazz) history.
Photos by KT Drasky. That’s not just any mural going up on the side of Laundry Daze at 1233 Divisadero, right next to the parking lot for the Little Zion Church. That’s a Mel Waters mural.
That’s Mel taking a quick break here in the bottom shot. Mel’s finishing up “Harlem of the West” today. Check it out when you’re walking by.
You can follow Mel on Instagram at melwaters. If you like the ink on his arms, it looks like he can do some nice body art for you, too. When he’s not painting murals, he does high class tattoos.
The Divisadero Corridor has periodically tried to recapture the spirit of the days when the Western Addition, particularly Fillmore and Divisadero streets were known as “The Harlem of the West.” A short-lived campaign a few years ago almost resulted in a billboard at Divisadero and Hayes reclaiming this title and featuring jazz musician and KPOO.FM deejay Bobbie “Spider” Webb.  Sadly, the project was stopped at the 11th hour by the owners of the long vacant Harding Theater. (Read more about that unfortunate episode here.)
Mel has permission from the owner of Laundry Daze to paint his mural on the side of their building. Let’s hope it stands the test of our current times and brings about more creative projects celebrating Divisadero’s place in San Francisco (and jazz) history.
Photos by KT Drasky.
    That’s not just any mural going up on the side of Laundry Daze at 1233 Divisadero, right next to the parking lot for the Little Zion Church. That’s a Mel Waters mural.
That’s Mel taking a quick break here in the bottom shot. Mel’s finishing up “Harlem of the West” today. Check it out when you’re walking by.
You can follow Mel on Instagram at melwaters. If you like the ink on his arms, it looks like he can do some nice body art for you, too. When he’s not painting murals, he does high class tattoos.
The Divisadero Corridor has periodically tried to recapture the spirit of the days when the Western Addition, particularly Fillmore and Divisadero streets were known as “The Harlem of the West.” A short-lived campaign a few years ago almost resulted in a billboard at Divisadero and Hayes reclaiming this title and featuring jazz musician and KPOO.FM deejay Bobbie “Spider” Webb.  Sadly, the project was stopped at the 11th hour by the owners of the long vacant Harding Theater. (Read more about that unfortunate episode here.)
Mel has permission from the owner of Laundry Daze to paint his mural on the side of their building. Let’s hope it stands the test of our current times and brings about more creative projects celebrating Divisadero’s place in San Francisco (and jazz) history.
Photos by KT Drasky. That’s not just any mural going up on the side of Laundry Daze at 1233 Divisadero, right next to the parking lot for the Little Zion Church. That’s a Mel Waters mural.
That’s Mel taking a quick break here in the bottom shot. Mel’s finishing up “Harlem of the West” today. Check it out when you’re walking by.
You can follow Mel on Instagram at melwaters. If you like the ink on his arms, it looks like he can do some nice body art for you, too. When he’s not painting murals, he does high class tattoos.
The Divisadero Corridor has periodically tried to recapture the spirit of the days when the Western Addition, particularly Fillmore and Divisadero streets were known as “The Harlem of the West.” A short-lived campaign a few years ago almost resulted in a billboard at Divisadero and Hayes reclaiming this title and featuring jazz musician and KPOO.FM deejay Bobbie “Spider” Webb.  Sadly, the project was stopped at the 11th hour by the owners of the long vacant Harding Theater. (Read more about that unfortunate episode here.)
Mel has permission from the owner of Laundry Daze to paint his mural on the side of their building. Let’s hope it stands the test of our current times and brings about more creative projects celebrating Divisadero’s place in San Francisco (and jazz) history.
Photos by KT Drasky.

    That’s not just any mural going up on the side of Laundry Daze at 1233 Divisadero, right next to the parking lot for the Little Zion Church. That’s a Mel Waters mural.

    That’s Mel taking a quick break here in the bottom shot. Mel’s finishing up “Harlem of the West” today. Check it out when you’re walking by.

    You can follow Mel on Instagram at melwaters. If you like the ink on his arms, it looks like he can do some nice body art for you, too. When he’s not painting murals, he does high class tattoos.

    The Divisadero Corridor has periodically tried to recapture the spirit of the days when the Western Addition, particularly Fillmore and Divisadero streets were known as “The Harlem of the West.” A short-lived campaign a few years ago almost resulted in a billboard at Divisadero and Hayes reclaiming this title and featuring jazz musician and KPOO.FM deejay Bobbie “Spider” Webb.  Sadly, the project was stopped at the 11th hour by the owners of the long vacant Harding Theater. (Read more about that unfortunate episode here.)

    Mel has permission from the owner of Laundry Daze to paint his mural on the side of their building. Let’s hope it stands the test of our current times and brings about more creative projects celebrating Divisadero’s place in San Francisco (and jazz) history.

    Photos by KT Drasky.